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Certified Translations Spanish-English-Swedish

Official translations, legally signed, stamped and certified in English, Swedish and more than 30 languages. Sworn Translations issued by Spanish Official Authorities and other regulatory bodies in Sweden.

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Trustworthy Certified Translations

Certified Translations of certificates from or into Swedish issued by official authorities.

Our translation agency offers you a fast service for official and certified translations Spanish-English-Swedish. Sworn or Certified translations are considered official documents for all purposes. Certified Translators in Spain act as Notaries Public or attesting officials. They certify that your translation in Swedish faithfully renders the original document. For some paperwork like birth or marriage certificates, police records, academic certificates or last wills and testaments you may be asked to produced a certified and legally binding translation into Swedish or from Swedish, either in your country or in Sweden.

The words “sworn” or “certified” imply that the translation has been signed, sealed and certified by an authorized translator officially acknowledged for the Swedish language. A sworn translation does not necessarily mean that the document has a legal nature (for more information, see Swedish Legal Translators).

If you want to know how much the cost is going to be, send us a quality scanned copy (photos are not accepted), your language combination (from or into Swedish) and your deadline.

Where is Swedish spoken?

Of the 10 million Swedes, more than 90% have access to the Internet. Swedish (svenska in Swedish), is the national language of Sweden and the Åland Islands.

 

Certified Translators

Our official translators for Swedish are native speakers with an extensive background and experience in the translation of legal documents, technical specifications like patents or medical reports that need an exact and faithful translation into English, Spanish and any given language.

The Hague Apostille

The Apostille is a form in which a Notary Public or official certifies that the signature initialed on a document is authentic. Many official documents in Swedish are authenticated with an Apostille. If you have to submit a document in another country (like Sweden), it is probably best to apostille the translation.

Hague Apostille

 Government Agencies

In Spain, Sworn and Certified translations from or into Swedish are carried out by Translators appointed by the Spanish Department of Foreign Affairs. In other countries, translators get an authorization from courts, official bodies and in some cases professional associations of translators.

Delivery deadlines

Certified translations of Swedish of short documents usually take no more than 2 or 3 business days, but it all depends on availability. Upon request, we can send you a scanned copy by e-mail, followed by the original by courier.

Price for a certified translation of Swedish

Certified Translation from or into Swedish are usually quoted based on a word count, if possible. In any case a minimum fee is always applied for short documents. The quote will always include courier costs.

Get a free quote for your Swedish Certified Translation

Documents

Among the documents for which a certified/official translation is usually required, from or into Swedish, are: diplomas, academic certificates, birth/marriage/death certificates, company annual accounts, divorce decrees, bank statements, police criminal records, regulatory documents, patents, etc.

How much do you know about Swedish?

Swedish is a North Germanic language spoken by about 10 million people in Sweden (Sverige). In 2007 there were 290,000 native speakers of Swedish in Finland, and 2.4 million speakers as a second language. It is estimated that in 2010 there are about 300,000 speakers of Swedish in countries other than Sweden or Finland. Many of them live in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain and Germany, and also in other Scandinavian countries, France, Switzerland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada and Australia.

Swedish is closely related to Norwegian and Danish, and its speakers often understand each other.

Finland was governed by Sweden from the 12th century until 1809. During that period, Swedish was the main language of government and education. Today, Finnish and Swedish are official languages in Finland.

There used to be Swedish-speaking communities in Estonia (Estland). About a thousand of these Swedes emigrated to southern Ukraine after Estonia became part of the Russian Empire in the 18th century. There they built a population known as Gammölsvänskbi (Old Swedish Town), which is now part of Zmiivka (Зміївка). Very few people still speak Swedish in this area. During World War II, other Swedish speakers fled from Estonia to Sweden. Only very few people in Estonia still speak Swedish today.

Between 800 and 1100 AD, an ancient northeastern dialect known as Runic Swedish was spoken in Sweden. It was written in the runic alphabet. It differed only slightly from the ancient Nordic dialect of Denmark, or runic Danish.

The two languages began to separate during the 12th century.
Swedish first appeared in the Latin alphabet in 1225 in the Westrogoda (Äldre Västgötalagen), the legal code used in the province of West Gothland (Västergötland). The language of this text is known as Early Old Swedish (klassisk fornsvenska or äldre fornsvenska), which was used until about 1375. Grammatically it was much more complex than modern Swedish.

Between 1375 and 1526, the language of Sweden was known as Late Old Swedish (yngre fornsvenska). It had undergone a grammatical simplification and a change of vowels, and by the 16th century it had more in common with modern Swedish. During this time, the Swede borrowed many words from Latin, Low German and Dutch.

The translation of the Bible into Swedish in 1526 is considered the beginning of modern Swedish. It helped to establish a consistent spelling for Swedish, although the spelling used in the translation was not entirely consistent. For example, the letters ä and ö were used instead of “æ” and “ø”, and “å” replaced “o” in many words.

The modern rules of Swedish spelling were created by the author Carl Gustaf af Leopold, on behalf of the Swedish Academy (Svenska Akademien). His proposal was published in 1801, and finally adopted by the Academy in 1874. The spelling was reformed in 1906, and the reform was only fully endorsed by the Swedish Academy in 1950.

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The Swedish language

Swedish is a North Germanic language spoken by about 10 million people in Sweden (Sverige). In 2007 there were 290,000 native speakers of Swedish in Finland, and 2.4 million speakers as a second language. It is estimated that in 2010 there are about 300,000 speakers of Swedish in countries other than Sweden or Finland. Many of them live in the United States, United Kingdom, Spain and Germany, and also in other Scandinavian countries, France, Switzerland, Belgium, the Netherlands, Canada and Australia.

Swedish is closely related to Norwegian and Danish, and its speakers often understand each other.

Finland was governed by Sweden from the 12th century until 1809. During that period, Swedish was the main language of government and education. Today, Finnish and Swedish are official languages in Finland.

There used to be Swedish-speaking communities in Estonia (Estland). About a thousand of these Swedes emigrated to southern Ukraine after Estonia became part of the Russian Empire in the 18th century. There they built a population known as Gammölsvänskbi (Old Swedish Town), which is now part of Zmiivka (Зміївка). Very few people still speak Swedish in this area. During World War II, other Swedish speakers fled from Estonia to Sweden. Only very few people in Estonia still speak Swedish today.

Between 800 and 1100 AD, an ancient northeastern dialect known as Runic Swedish was spoken in Sweden. It was written in the runic alphabet. It differed only slightly from the ancient Nordic dialect of Denmark, or runic Danish.

The two languages began to separate during the 12th century.
Swedish first appeared in the Latin alphabet in 1225 in the Westrogoda (Äldre Västgötalagen), the legal code used in the province of West Gothland (Västergötland). The language of this text is known as Early Old Swedish (klassisk fornsvenska or äldre fornsvenska), which was used until about 1375. Grammatically it was much more complex than modern Swedish.

Between 1375 and 1526, the language of Sweden was known as Late Old Swedish (yngre fornsvenska). It had undergone a grammatical simplification and a change of vowels, and by the 16th century it had more in common with modern Swedish. During this time, the Swede borrowed many words from Latin, Low German and Dutch.

The translation of the Bible into Swedish in 1526 is considered the beginning of modern Swedish. It helped to establish a consistent spelling for Swedish, although the spelling used in the translation was not entirely consistent. For example, the letters ä and ö were used instead of “æ” and “ø”, and “å” replaced “o” in many words.

The modern rules of Swedish spelling were created by the author Carl Gustaf af Leopold, on behalf of the Swedish Academy (Svenska Akademien). His proposal was published in 1801, and finally adopted by the Academy in 1874. The spelling was reformed in 1906, and the reform was only fully endorsed by the Swedish Academy in 1950.